PBS Strategy in the Streaming Era: Meet Sylvia Bugg, PBS Chief Programming Executive & General Manager at Sunny Side of the Doc

Sylvia Bugg is PBS‘s highly-respected Chief Programming Executive & General Manager, General Audience Programming. Sylvia shares her strategy and program highlights in our engaging Meet the Executive session for Sunny Side of the Doc. Watch the Session: Key Themes I begin by asking Sylvia how PBS is adapting to the streaming era. She references clips …

Trillion-dollar Death Stars are Existential Threats to Legacy Media Players. 2021 Media Universe Map by Evan Shapiro

 “When you look at the entertainment war for attention and you realise that there are seven trillion-dollar Death Stars – Amazon, Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Apple, Tencent and Alibaba – all with unlimited resources and diversified revenue models, you understand why scale is the most important thing,” says Evan Shapiro, producer, media commentator and creator of …

SUNNY SIDE OF THE DOC – NEWS ROUNDUP, June 2021: Unscripted Investment Frenzy & more

Story of the Month: Investors Target Unscripted Production. There’s a frenzy of investment in unscripted production // Wall Street Journal. New SVOD’s fail to understand that success depends on streaming addiction // Lightshed Partners. Netflix Australia: Revenues surge but avoids taxes and local production // The Age + Documentary Business. Audiences want more documentaries in streaming libraries …

Streaming Addiction: New SVOD entrants are all making a critical strategic mistake

Two articles on the state of the industry caught my attention this week: A brilliant analysis of a key success factor for streamers from Lightshed Partners. And a ho-hum Wall Street Journal story that nonetheless captures the current investment frenzy for Unscripted productions. Nat Geo also shared an updated INCLUSION STANDARDS. Scroll down for the …

Netflix Shrinks Australia’s Local Production Spend: My back-of-envelope lesson

The rise of the streamers has an overall negative impact on global spending on television production. Why? Channels greenlight 200-600 hours / year to populate their linear, 7-day schedules with original programs. Streamers buy enough new programs to attract and retain subscribers. The following Australian example is revealing… if you accept my back-of-envelope calculations and …